Front Crawl Technique – Head Position and Body Roll

Front Crawl Technique – Head Position and Body Roll

To swim front crawl with the greatest efficiency and prevent neck injuries, you need to properly position your head and roll your body. This article explains the correct swimming technique to be able to do this. Have a Neutral Head Position In the past, it was often...
Front Crawl Swimming Drills: Over Switch

Front Crawl Swimming Drills: Over Switch

Over Switch is the last one in our sequence of front crawl swimming drills. It lets you practice an early hand entry during the arm recovery. This is to avoid the common tendency of overreaching during the recovery which for several reasons increases drag and can also...
Front Crawl Swimming Drills: Zipper Switch

Front Crawl Swimming Drills: Zipper Switch

Whereas in the previous front crawl drill, Under Switch, the focus was on the synergy between arm stroke movements and body roll, in Zipper Switch the focus is on achieving a compact and efficient arm recovery: Achieving a compact recovery allows you to decrease drag...
Front Crawl Swimming Drills – Under Switch

Front Crawl Swimming Drills – Under Switch

You will finally transition into swimming the front crawl stroke with the next few swimming drills, which teach you arm stroke movements and coordination. They are called switch drills because you switch between sides over the course of a drill cycle. In the first one...
Front Crawl Swimming Drills – Hand-Lead Nose Up / Nose Down

Front Crawl Swimming Drills – Hand-Lead Nose Up / Nose Down

Hand-Lead Nose Up / Nose Down is the last one of our balance drills for the front crawl stroke. It lets you practice balance floating on your side with one arm extended forward. This is useful because you will roll from side to side into this specific side position...
Front Crawl Swimming Drills – Hand-Lead Side Balance

Front Crawl Swimming Drills – Hand-Lead Side Balance

The next set of front crawl swimming drills let you practice balance while having one arm extended forward. You need to practice this position because you will have one arm extended forward for the most part of the stroke cycle, and you need to maintain good...

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